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Dueville Comune Cemetery Extension (Dueville, Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 South African, 2 French, United Kingdom, 136 total burials.
The extension is a CWGC cemetery and is permanently open. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.
Dueville is 12 kilometres north of the town of Vicenza. Leave the piazza in the centre of Dueville and head north towards Montecchio. At the traffic lights turn left onto Via Fosca. The cemetery is 100 metres on the left opposite the comune cemetery. Cemetery address: Via S. Fosca s.n - 36031 Dueville (VI) Veneto. Latitude: 45.63984, Longitude: 11.54823.
The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From April 1918 to the early months of 1919, the 9th, 24th and 39th Casualty Clearing Stations occupied the village school at Dueville and used the extension to the communal cemetery for the burial of those who died of wounds or disease. The Allied front on the Asiago Plateau was about 22 kilometres distant; the Piave front, to which the XIVth Corps was moved for the final attack on the Austrian positions in October 1918, was about 64 kilometres from the village. The cemetery now contains 134 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, some of which were brought into the cemetery from other burial grounds after the Armistice and in the following years. The extension also contians two French war graves.

French Military Cemetery at Rome (Roma, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) - 1,888 burials. - Mostly Morrocean and Algerian.
Is just off Via della Camillucia, toward the Olympic Stadium is a modest cemetery for 1,700 French Expediotionary Corps soldiers, mainly Moroccans and Algerians. The cemetery is at the end of a small road, Via dei Casali di S. Spirito. Most of the grave markers bear a muslim crescent while some have crosses. All, however, bear the inscription “Mort pour la France”.

Miano (Miano, Napoli Province, Campania Region, Italy) - Also known as Naples War Cemetery. Please Note: The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime but you should be aware that Naples War Cemetery is located in an area where there have been a number of robberies from individuals. The Commission cannot accept responsibility for any incident which might occur but you may wish to bear this in mind both in planning and during your visit to the cemetery. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery lies in the locality of Miano at Via Vincenzo Ianfolla, off the Corso Secondigliano, in the Commune and Province of Naples. Take the autostrada A1, the Rome to Naples road. After the last toll booth, carry on following the signs for the airport. Pass the end of the airport approach road and turn right at the next T junction, following the main road for about 4 kilometres. Cemetery address: Via Vincenzo Janfolla - 80145 Milano (NA) Campania. GPS Co-ordinates: Latitude: 40.88497, Longitude: 14.24000.

The 65th and 92nd General Hospitals were in Naples from late in 1943 until the end of the war, also the 67th General Hospital for the greater part of that time. The site for the war cemetery was chosen in November 1943 and burials were made in it from the hospitals and garrison. Later graves were brought in from a number of small cemeteries in the immediate vicinity. Naples War Cemetery contains 1,202 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities, including French.
On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. The 65th and 92nd General Hospitals were in Naples from late in 1943 until the end of the war, also the 67th General Hospital for the greater part of that time. The site for the war cemetery was chosen in November 1943 and burials were made in it from the hospitals and garrison. Later graves were brought in from a number of small cemeteries in the immediate vicinity. Naples War Cemetery contains 1,202 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities.

Ravenna War Cemetery (near Piangipani, Ravenna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - 11 South Africans, 8 Australians, 33 total burials from WWI; 33 Jewish Brigade, United Kingdom, Indians, Canadians, New Zealanders, 955 total burials from WWII, 63 Unknown.
The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via the main entrance.
The War Cemetery lies on a comune road 1 kilometre south of the SS16 from Ravenna to Ferrara near the village of Piangipane. The turning from the main road is at the 143 kilometres stone, 12 kilometres west of Ravenna. The turning is marked with a CWGC sign pointing in the direction of the cemetery, and a road sign marked 'Piangipane 4 kilometres'. Continue along the minor road until a further CWGC sign is seen. The entrance to the cemetery is located on the left hand side of the road. The nearest train station to the cemetery is Mezzano but there is no taxi service available from there. There is however, a taxi service from Ravenna train station. Cemetery address: Via Piangipane 24B - 48100 Piangipane (RA) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.441525, Longitude: 12.107673.

Ravenna was taken by the Canadian Corps at the beginning of December 1944, and the burials in the cemetery there reflect the fighting for the Senio line and the period of relative quiet during the first three months of 1945. Many of the men buried there were Canadians; one of the last tasks of the Canadian Corps before being moved to north-west Europe was the clearing of the area between Ravenna and the Comacchio lagoon. Others are Indians from the 10th Indian Division, and New Zealanders. The site for the cemetery was selected by the Army in 1945 for burials from the surrounding battlefields. Ravenna War Cemetery contains 955 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 63 of them unidentified. There are also 33 First World War burials, 30 of them brought in from Gradisca Comune Cemetery in 1973, the others from comune cemeteries at Arzigano, Fano and Monterosso al Mare. Among those buried in the cemetery are 33 men of the Jewish Infantry Brigade Group which was formed in September 1944, chiefly by volunteers from Palestine; the burials at Ravenna form the largest concentration of casualties from the Brigade. There is 1 Merchant Seaman whose death is not attributable to war service and 1 French burial.

Rome - see Anzio

Venafro Free French Cemetery (Venafro, Isernia Province, Molise Region, Italy) WWII French - 6,000 men from Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia and other African countries who fought on behalf of the French are buried here.

Links to other sites about French Military Cemeteries include:

Battle for Anzio
Battle for Cassino
Isernia Province
War Cemeteries in Italy by Region
WWII Military Cemeteries

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