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War Cemeteries in Italy by Region

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WW I and WW II Cemeteries by location in Italy

Abruzzo Region

Moro River Canadian War Cemetery (Ortona Porto, Chieti Province, Abruzzo Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - Canada, 17 South Africa, United Kingdom, New Zealand, 4 Australia, 52 Unknown, 1615 total.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The Moro River Canadian War Cemetery lies in the locality of San Donato in the Comune of Ortona and is sited on high ground near the sea just east of the main Adriatic coast road (SS16). The cemetery can be reached from Rome on the autostrada A25 (Rome-Pescara) by branching on the autostrada A14 and leaving it at Ortona. The approach road to the cemetery from the main road passes under an arch forming part of the little church of San Donato. Cemetery address: Contrada San Donato - 66028 Ortona Porto (CH) Abruzzo. Latitude: 42.336403, Longitude: 14.416677.

On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. Progress through southern Italy was rapid despite stiff resistance, but by the end of October, the Allies were facing the German winter defensive position known as the Gustav Line, which stretched from the river Garigliano in the west to the Sangro in the east. The Allied force that had fought its way up the Adriatic took the Sangro river positions by 30 November. The 1st Canadian Division went on to cross the Moro river on 6 December against stiff opposition, and to take Ortona on the 28th, after a week of bitter street fighting. The 2nd New Zealand division made some advances further inland but thereafter, there was virtually no movement east of the Appennines until after the fall of Rome. The site of the cemetery was chosen by the Canadian Corps in January 1944. It contains the graves of those who died during that fighting at Moro river and Ortona, and during the weeks that preceded and followed it. In December 1943 alone, the 1st Canadian Division suffered over 500 fatal battle casualties. Burials other than those of members of the Canadian forces are almost all in plots 12, 13 and 16. Moro River Canadian War Cemetery contains 1,615 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Sangro River War Cemetery (Torino di Sangro, Chieti Province, Abruzzo Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1768 United Kingdom, nearly 400 Indian, 355 New Zealander, 77 South African, 4 Australian, 2617 total burials, 520 Indian cremations.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200

The Sangro River War Cemetery lies in the Contrada Sentinelle in the Commune of Torino di Sangro. Take the autostrada A14 (the road that runs from Taranto in the south to Ancona in the north) and exit at Val di Sangro. After approximately 2.5 kilometres from the exit turn right onto the SS16, Pescara to Vasto road, for nearly 2 kilometres. There is then a sharp right turn up to cemetery. If you come from the station, take a taxi from Torino di Sangro station, otherwise follow the road signs to SS16 (see direction), turn right at the crossroad and continue following the signs. The station is about 7 kilometres from the cemetery. Cemetery address: Contrada Sentinelle s.n. - 66020 Torino di Sangro (CH) Abruzzo. Latitude: 42.218406, Longitude: 14.535594.

By 4 November, the Allied force that had fought its way up the Adriatic coast was preparing to attack the Sangro river positions. A bridgehead had been established by the 24th and by nightfall on the 30th, the whole ridge overlooking the river was in Allied hands. The site of this cemetery was selected by the 5th Corps and into it were brought the graves of men who had died in the fierce fighting on the Adriatic sector of the front in November-December 1943, and during the static period that followed. In addition, the cemetery contains the graves of a number of escaped prisoners of war who died while trying to reach the Allied lines. SANGRO RIVER WAR CEMETERY contains 2,617 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. Within the cemetery will be found the SANGRO RIVER CREMATION MEMORIAL, one of three memorials erected in Italy to officers and men of the Indian forces whose remains were cremated in accordance with their faith - the other two cremation memorials are in Forli Indian Army War Cemetery and Rimini Gurkha War Cemetery. The memorial at Sangro River commemorates more than 500 servicemen.

Campania Region

Caserta War Cemetery (Caserta, Caserta Province, Campania Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 54 South Africans, 10 Australians, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canada, Total: 768 burials, 13 Unknown.

Outside normal working hours the cemetery gates are kept locked, but may be opened by dialing 1221 on the padlock combination. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the autostrada A1 (Roma to Napoli), and leave it at the Caserta Nord exit. Proceed to the first set of traffic lights and then turn left and continue along the main street eastward for about 1.8 kilometres; just prior to an Army barracks and well before the Royal Palace (Palazzo Reale) there is a small left turn. Turn left here and proceed to the T-junction at the end. Here turn right and continue along, under the bridge to the main crossroads. This is the first occasion you will see a CWGC signpost; turn left and carry on for a short distance to the large roundabout at the end of the road. There will be a large Comune Cemetery located on the far side; turn right into the obvious car park. If travelling by train, from the station proceed down Corso Trieste and turn left at the traffic lights. Continue on for approximately 2 kilometres until you reach the roundabout. The CWGC plot will be found at the far end of the cemetery. Cars should be parked within the Comune Cemetery grounds for security reasons. Cemetery address: Via Talamonti, 5 - 81100 Caserta (CE) Campania. Latitude: 41.08862, Longitude: 14.344041.

On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. The Royal Palace at Caserta served as headquarters for the Allied armies in Italy for the greater part of the duration of the Italian campaign and the 2nd General Hospital was at Caserta from December 1943 until September 1945. Some of those buried here died in the hospital, others as prisoners of war (there was a POW Hospital at Caserta) before the Allied invasion. There are also a few burials from the October 1943 fighting on the River Volturno, which lies not far away to the north. Caserta War Cemetery contains 768 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Mignano Monte Lungo Cemetery (Mignano Monte Lungo, Caserta Province, Campania Region, Italy) WWII Italian men who died in the battles for the liberation of Italy 1943-45, gathered from temporary cemeteries along the Gothic Line. 975 burials + small museum + assorted pieces of artillery.

Take San Viltore exit from A1.

Naples British Cemetery (Napoli, Napoli Province, Campania Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - Indian, United Kingdom, 18 total burials.

From the A1 take the Tangenziale west towards Capodimonte and Capodichino airport. Exit at Capodichino onto the main road, Viale Comandante Umberto Maddalena. Turn left into this road, going south for 250 metres to Largo S. Maria del Pianto and bearing right into the Via Don Bosco for 200 metres where the British or Protestant Cemetery is located (in the district of Doganella).

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. The Royal and Merchant Navies were active in the Mediterranean and Adriatic throughout the war and many of their dead are buried along the Italian coast. Naples British Cemetery contains 13 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. Eight of the burials are associated with the torpedoing of the transport "Canara" on 9 August 1917.

Naples War Cemetery (Miano, Napoli Province, Campania Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1202 Commonwealth burials plus some other nationalities and some non-war burials.

Please Note: The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime but you should be aware that Naples War Cemetery is located in an area where there have been a number of robberies from individuals. The Commission cannot accept responsibility for any incident which might occur but you may wish to bear this in mind both in planning and during your visit to the cemetery. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery lies in the locality of Miano at Via Vincenzo Ianfolla, off the Corso Secondigliano, in the Comune of Naples. Take the autostrada A1, the Rome to Naples road. After the last toll booth, carry on following the signs for the airport. Pass the end of the airport approach road and turn right at the next T junction, following the main road for about 4 kilometres. Cemetery address: Via Vincenzo Janfolla - 80145 Miano (NA) Campania. Latitude: 40.88497, Longitude: 14.24000.

The 65th and 92nd General Hospitals were in Naples from late in 1943 until the end of the war, also the 67th General Hospital for the greater part of that time. The site for the war cemetery was chosen in November 1943 and burials were made in it from the hospitals and garrison. Later graves were brought in from a number of small cemeteries in the immediate vicinity. Naples War Cemetery contains 1,202 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities, including French.

On 3 September 1943 the Allies invaded the Italian mainland, the invasion coinciding with an armistice made with the Italians who then re-entered the war on the Allied side. Allied objectives were to draw German troops from the Russian front and more particularly from France, where an offensive was planned for the following year. The 65th and 92nd General Hospitals were in Naples from late in 1943 until the end of the war, also the 67th General Hospital for the greater part of that time. The site for the war cemetery was chosen in November 1943 and burials were made in it from the hospitals and garrison. Later graves were brought in from a number of small cemeteries in the immediate vicinity. Naples War Cemetery contains 1,202 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities.

Salerno War Cemetery (Montecorvino Pugliano, Salerno Province, Campania Region, Italy) - WWI Memorial and WWII Commonwealth - 1846 burials; 10 South Africans. 20 Australians. 1,650 UK, 30 Can, 3 NZ, 55 Indian, 111 unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Coming from Rome, proceed along the A30 following the signs for Salerno-Reggio Calabria; then take the A3, exiting at Pontecagnano or Battipaglia. Turn back towards Salerno on the SS18 coast road. Signs for the cemetery, which is on the north side of the road, should be seen after passing through Bellizzi. Cemetery address: Via G. Leopardi, 1 - Bivio Pratole - 84090 Montecorvino Pugliano (SA) Campania. Latitude: 40.625511, Longitude: 14.922513.

Commonwealth and American forces landed near Salerno on 8-9 September 1943 and there was fierce fighting for some days in the bridgehead that they established. The site for the cemetery was chosen in November 1943 and it contains many burials resulting from the landings and the fighting that followed, but graves were also brought in later from a wide area of south-western Italy. The 59th General Hospital was in the vicinity of Salerno at the end of 1943 and early in 1944. Salerno War Cemetery contains 1,846 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 107 of them unidentified. One casualty of the First World War is also commemorated in the cemetery by special memorial, his grave in a local civil cemetery having been lost.

Emilia-Romagna Region

Argenta Gap War Cemetery (Argenta, Ferrara Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 10 South Africans. 6 Australians, 625 total burials, 8 Unknown.

This cemetery is permanently open, with the main entrance some 800 metres away from the nearest road. The track from the road to the cemetery entrance runs over private land and in order to avoid litter, unrelated car parking and other undesirable activities, the landowner has placed a barrier across the track. The barrier is normally unlocked between 08.00 and 19.30. Should the barrier be locked at the time of your visit, the combination lock number is 1221. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200.

The town of Argenta is 2 kilometres south of the cemetery on the SS16 connecting Ravenna with Ferrara. Approaching the cemetery from the south, bear right just before reaching the town of Argenta and proceed down the Strada di Circonvallazione, passing the railway station on the right. Take the second turning to the right and, after crossing the railway, continue forward to a fork and again bear right. The turning to the cemetery is on the left, a little further on, near a farm. Approaching the cemetery from the north, turn sharp left off the main road at the first crossroads on the borders of the town and then take the third turning to the left which will lead to the railway crossing mentioned above. If coming from Ravenna, follow the signs to Ferrara. After Argenta, follow the brown provincial signs, onwards past the railway station and left at the green CWGC sign to the cemetery. Cemetery address: Via Piangipane snc - 44011 Argenta (FE) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.634143, Longitude: 11.831902.

Following the fall of Rome to the Allies in June 1944, the German retreat became ordered and successive stands were made on a series of defensive lines. In the northern Appenine mountains the last of these, the Gothic Line, was breached by the Allies during the Autumn campaign and the front inched forward as far as Ravenna in the Adratic sector, but with divisions transferred to support the new offensive in France, and the Germans dug in to a number of key defensive positions, the advance stalled as winter set in. The final Allied offensive begain early the following April and Argenta Gap War Cemetery marks the final stages of the hard fighting in Italy in the spring of 1945. The site of the cemetery was chosen by the 78th Division for battlefield burials, and it was later enlarged when burials were brought in from the surrounding district. It contains, among others, the graves of many men of the Commandos engaged in the amphibious operations on the shores of the Comacchio lagoon early in April 1945. Argenta Gap War Cemetery contains 625 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, eight of them unidentified.

Bologna War Cemetery (Bologna, Bologna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, Canadian, New Zealand, 11 South Africans. 3 Australians. 184 total burials, 8 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery lies in the suburb of San Lazzaro (Parco dei Cedri). It stands on the north side of the SS9, between Bologna and Forli, at Via Dozza, about 5 kilometres south-east of the town and about 200 metres before the road crosses over the River Savena. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Bologna Centrale, with a taxi and bus service available (S. Lazzaro di Savena direction). Cemetery address: Via Dozza Giuseppe 32 - 40139 Bologna (BO) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.474610, Longitude: 11.399785.

During the winter months, Bologna lay tantalizingly just out of reach of the Allied armies; the town became their first major objective in the spring of 1945 and was taken on 21 April by Poles from the Eighth Army and Americans from the Fifth Army. The cemetery was opened as a garrison cemetery in June 1945 and later, burials were brought in to it from the surrounding area. Bologna War Cemetery contains 184 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Carpi, Modena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Castiglione dei Pepoli South African Cemetery (Castiglione dei Pepoli, Bologna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italia) WWII Commonwealth - 401 South African, 101 United Kingdom, 502 total burials.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. PLEASE NOTE: This cemetery is steeply terraced with numerous steps. Wheelchair access into the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Castiglione dei Pepoli is about 60 kilometres north of Florence and about 60 kilometres south of Bologna. It is situated in mountainous country near the highest point of the road connecting Prato and Bologna. The cemetery is on the west side of the road a little to the north of the town. Take the autostrada A1 and leave it at Roncobilaccio exit and keep heading for Castiglione. The cemetery is at the edge of the road on the right entering the town. Cemetery address: Via Bolognese, 51 40035 Castiglione dei Pepoli (BO) Emilia-Romagna. Latitude: 44.144438, Longitude: 11.161466.

Castiglione South African Cemetery was started in November 1944 by the 6th South African Armoured Division, which had entered Castiglione at the end of September and remained in the neighbourhood until the following April. Many of the burials were made direct from the battlefields of the Appennines, where during that winter South African troops held positions some 8 kilometres north of Castiglione. The majority of those buried in this cemetery were South Africans, the remainder belonging mostly to the 24th Guards Brigade, which was under command of the 6th South African Armoured Division. In the cemetery there is a memorial building originally erected by South African troops, which contains two tablets unveiled by Field-Marshal Smuts; they bear the inscription in English and Afrikaans: TO SAVE MANKIND YOURSELVES YOU SCORNED TO SAVE OM DIE MENSDOM TE DIEN HET JUL VEILIGHEID VERSMAAD The cemetery contains 502 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Cesena War Cemetery (Cesena, Forli-Cesena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 5 South African, Canadian, New Zealand, 775 total burials, 3 unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to this cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the autostrada A14, Bologna-Ancona, exiting at Cesena. Proceed along this road for about 4 kilometres arriving at a roundabout. Turn left and then take the second road on the right hand side. After 500 metres, turning left, enter into a parking area and take a little road leading to the cemetery main entrance. Cemetery address: Via Spinelli - 47023 Cesena (FC) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.149269, Longitude: 12.260512.

In the northern Appennine mountains, the Gothic Line, was breached by the Allies during the Autumn campaign and the front inched forward as far as Ravenna in the Adratic sector, but with divisions transferred to support the new offensive in France, and the Germans dug in to a number of key defensive positions, the advance stalled as winter set in. Most of those buried in this cemetery died during the advance from Rimini to Forli and beyond in September-November 1944, an advance across one flooded river after another in atrocious autumn weather. The cemetery site was selected in November 1944 and burials were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. Cesena War Cemetery contains 775 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Coriano Ridge War Cemetery (Coriano, Rimini Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1,411 United Kingdom, 427 Canadians, 52 New Zealanders, 28 South Africans, 8 Indian, 1 Australian, 1 Russian, 1939 total burials, 11 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Coriano Ridge War Cemetery is 3.5 kilometres west of Riccione, a seaside resort on the Adriatic coast, and is reached by turning west off the main Rimini/Riccione road, the SS 16, about 1 kilometre north-west of Riccione. At this turning there is a sign leading to the cemetery. Follow it in the direction of Coriano until a T junction is reached, then turn left and after a short distance the cemetery will be found on the right-hand side. Cemetery address: Via Piane, 4 - 47853 Coriano (RN) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 43.98485, Longitude: 12.604041.

Coriano Ridge was the last important ridge in the way of the Allied advance in the Adriatic sector in the autumn of 1944. Its capture was the key to Rimini and eventually to the River Po. German parachute and panzer troops, aided by bad weather, resisted all attacks on their positions between 4 and 12 September 1944. On the night of 12 September the Eighth Army reopened its attack on the Ridge, with the 1st British and 5th Canadian Armoured Divisions. This attack was successful in taking the Ridge, but marked the beginning of a week of the heaviest fighting experienced since Cassino in May, with daily losses for the Eighth Army of some 150 killed. The site for the cemetery was selected in April 1945 and was created from graves brought in from the surrounding battlefields. Coriano Ridge War Cemetery contains 1,939 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Faenza Comune Cemetery (Faenza, Ravenna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - United Kingdom, Indian, 54 total burials.

Wheelchair access to this site is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The Comune Cemetery will be found at Viale Marconi 34, Faenza, just south of the town on the road to Florence. The Commonwealth plot is near the south-west corner of the Comune Cemetery.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. In 1917, Faenza became No.3 Rest Camp on the Mediterranean Lines of Communication and the Headquarters of a Lines of Communication area. It was also the site of a supply depot and of military general hospitals. The Commonwealth plot in the comune cemetery contains 54 First World War burials.

Faenza War Cemetery (Faenza, Ravenna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 8 South Africans, 4 Australians, United Kingdom, New Zealanders, Canadians, 1152 total burials, 13 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the Bologna-Ancona autostrada A14 and exit at Faenza. The War Cemetery lies 1.5 kilometres south-east of Faenza and is approached by a secondary road which branches off the main road Bologna-Forli (Route No.9) just east of the town. If travelling by train, it is recommended to take a taxi from Faenza train station to the cemetery, a journey of approximately 10 minutes. Cemetery address: Via Santa Lucia, 14 - 48018 Faenza (RA) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.275319, Longitude: 11.891563.

In the northern Appenine mountains the Gothic Line was breached by the Allies during the Autumn campaign and the front inched forward as far as Ravenna in the Adratic sector, but with divisions transferred to support the new offensive in France, and the Germans dug in to a number of key defensive positions, the advance stalled as winter set in. The war cemetery at Faenza was formed during these months for the burial of those who were killed in the static fighting before the Allied advance was renewed in April 1945. Faenza War Cemetery contains 1,152 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 13 of which are unidentified.

Forli Indian Army War Cemetery and Cremation Memorial (Forli, Forli-Cesena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 30 South Africans, 1 Australian, United Kingdom, 496 total burials, 15 Unknown plus 800 Indian men listed on the Memorial.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the autostrada A14, Bologna to Ancona and exit at Forli. Follow the road into the town of Forli for about 3 kilometres and the Indian War Cemetery can be found on the left hand side, opposite the Comune Cemetery. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Forli, from which a taxi can be taken. Cemetery address: Via Ravegnana 278P - 47100 Forli (FC) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.233388, Longitude: 12.060227.

The site of this cemetery was selected in December 1944 by the 10th Indian Division, which had come into the line in the Adriatic sector south of Cesena at the beginning of October 1944. The division had played an important part in the heavy fighting, in appalling weather, between then and the end of the year, suffering considerable casualties. It had been preceded on the Eighth Army front by the 4th Indian Division which had left to go to Greece, and during the fighting in the spring of 1945, the 8th Indian Division also fought on this front. FORLI INDIAN ARMY WAR CEMETERY contains 496 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. Within the cemetery, is the FORLI CREMATION MEMORIAL commemorating nearly 800 Hindu and Sikh officers and men of the Indian Army. This is one of three Indian cremation memorials in Italy, the others being in Sangro River War Cemetery and in Rimini Gurkha War Cemetery.

Forli War Cemetery (Vecchiazzano, Forli-Cesena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - Indians, United Kingdom, New Zealanders, 738 total, 4 unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery is located on the outskirts of Forli, about 3 kilometres South-West of the town, in the locality of Vecchiazzano, Via Borghina. From the SS9 to the west of the town, take the SS67 to Florence. After 3-4 km there is a signpost pointing left to Vecchiazzano. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Forli, from which a taxi can be taken. Cemetery address: Via Caduti delle Forze Alleate - 47100 Vecchiazzano (FC) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.205164, Longitude: 12.014418.

The cemetery site was selected soon after the Eighth Army took Forli in November 1944 and graves were brought into it from the surrounding battlefields. Many of those buried there lost their lives in the heavy fighting between Rimini and Ravenna which took place in appalling weather in October-December 1944. Forli War Cemetery contains 738 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 4 of which are unidentifed.

Greek Cemetery at Riccione (Riccione, Rimini Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Greek - 114 burials.

Meldola War Cemetery (Meldola, Forli-Cesena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1 South African, 145 total burials.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

It is located south of the SS9 from Bologna to Rimini, 10 km south of Ronco, itself equidistant between Forli and Forlimpopoli. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Forli, where a taxi service is available. Cemetery address: Via Gualchiera 1A - 47014 Meldola (FC) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.143634, Longitude: 12.06776.

Meldola War Cemetery was originally a battlefield cemetery of the 46th Division, into which a few burials were concentrated; they all date from the last week of October and the month of November 1944. Meldola itself was taken on 30 October, and in the ensuing month the 46th and 4th Divisions advanced to the Lamone River. Meldola War Cemetery contains 145 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Modena, Modena Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Parma, Parma Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Piacenza, Piacenza Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Ravenna War Cemetery (near Piangipani, Ravenna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - 11 South Africans, 8 Australians, 33 total burials from WWI; 33 Jewish Brigade, United Kingdom, Indians, Canadians, New Zealanders, 955 total burials from WWII, 63 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via the main entrance.

The War Cemetery lies on a comune road 1 kilometre south of the SS16 from Ravenna to Ferrara near the village of Piangipane. The turning from the main road is at the 143 kilometres stone, 12 kilometres west of Ravenna. The turning is marked with a CWGC sign pointing in the direction of the cemetery, and a road sign marked 'Piangipane 4 kilometres'. Continue along the minor road until a further CWGC sign is seen. The entrance to the cemetery is located on the left hand side of the road. The nearest train station to the cemetery is Mezzano but there is no taxi service available from there. There is however, a taxi service from Ravenna train station. Cemetery address: Via Piangipane 24B - 48100 Piangipane (RA) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.441525, Longitude: 12.107673.

Ravenna was taken by the Canadian Corps at the beginning of December 1944, and the burials in the cemetery there reflect the fighting for the Senio line and the period of relative quiet during the first three months of 1945. Many of the men buried there were Canadians; one of the last tasks of the Canadian Corps before being moved to north-west Europe was the clearing of the area between Ravenna and the Comacchio lagoon. Others are Indians from the 10th Indian Division, and New Zealanders. The site for the cemetery was selected by the Army in 1945 for burials from the surrounding battlefields. Ravenna War Cemetery contains 955 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 63 of them unidentified. There are also 33 First World War burials, 30 of them brought in from Gradisca Comune Cemetery in 1973, the others from comune cemeteries at Arzignano, Fano and Monterosso al Mare. Among those buried in the cemetery are 33 men of the Jewish Infantry Brigade Group which was formed in September 1944, chiefly by volunteers from Palestine; the burials at Ravenna form the largest concentration of casualties from the Brigade. There is 1 Merchant Seaman whose death is not attributable to war service and 1 French burial.

Riccione Comune Cemetery (Riccione, Rimini Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 United Kingdom burial

Riccione is on the Adriatic coast, 9.6 kilometres South-East of Rimini, on the main railway line from Brindisi to Milan. Riccione Comune Cemetery is on the Via Giulio Cesare, within the old cemetery known as "Cimitero Vecchio".

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. Riccione Comune Cemetery contains one Commonwealth burial of the First World War.

Rimini Ghurkha Cemetery and Cremation Memorial (Rimini, Rimini Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 618 total Indian burials plus Cremation Memorial for 172 Indians.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to this cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery lies just west of the SS72 from Rimini to San Marino and six kilometres from Rimini. Take the autostrada A14, Bologna-Ancona. Exit at San Marino, Rimini South. On leaving the motorway head towards San Marino and the cemetery is 4.5 kilometres down this road on the right hand side. Within the cemetery is located the Rimini Cremation Memorial. This Memorial is one of three memorials erected in Italy to officers and men of the Indian Army who were cremated - the other two cremation memorials are in Forli Indian Army War Cemetery and in Sangro River War Cemetery. Cemetery address: Via Consolare Rimini-San Marino 31C - 47900 Rimini (RN) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.005097, Longitude: 12.543624.

There was severe fighting near Rimini in the autumn of 1944 in which the 4th and 10th Indian Divisions had an important share. On 21 September 1944, the 3rd Greek Mountain Brigade entered Rimini but during the winter of 1944-45, the line was pushed very little farther forward. The site of RIMINI GURKHA WAR CEMETERY was chosen in October 1945 and graves were brought into it from the surrounding battlefields. It now contains 618 Second World War burials, all of the Indian forces. Within the cemetery stands the RIMINI CREMATION MEMORIAL, one of the three memorials erected in Italy to officers and men of the Indian Army whose remains were cremated. The Rimini memorial bears 172 commemorations. The other two cremation memorials are in Forli Indian Army War Cemetery and in Sangro River War Cemetery.

Villanova Canadian War Cemetery (Bagnacavallo, Ravenna Province, Emilia-Romagna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 212 total burials.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access is possible via the main entrance.
Take autostrada A14, Bologna-Ancona, and branch off to Ravenna. Turn left along the SS16 towards Ferrara and at 7.5 kilometres, at the village of Mezzano, turn left to Villanova, about 4 kilometres. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Mezzano but there is no taxi service from there. Taxi's are available however, from Ravenna train station. Cemetery address: Via Chiesa 11 - 48020 Bagnacavallo (RA) Emilia Romagna. Latitude: 44.45150, Longitude: 12.05180.

The site of this cemetery was chosen by the 5th Canadian Armoured Division for battlefield burials. It was in the vicinity of Villanova that troops of this Division succeeded in establishing a bridgehead over the River Lamone in the night 10/11 December 1944. West of this bridgehead there was heavy fighting in the following days, when attempts were made to cross the three canals that run from Faenza to the sea. From 12 to 15 December, the Lanark and Renfrew Scottish Regiment and the 4th Princess Louise Dragoon Guards suffered heavily in these attempts, and 85 of the burials in the cemetery come from these two regiments. Others include those killed in the advance to the final line held by the Canadians on the River Senio before they left Italy in February 1945. Villanova Canadian War Cemetery contains 212 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region

Corva Comune Cemetery (Azzano Decimo, Pordenone Province, Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy) - 1 South African, 1 total burial

Corva Comune Cemetery is South of Pordenone on the way from Treviso to Udine.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Corva Communal Cemetery contains one Commonwealth burial of the First World War.

Gradisca d'Isonzo, Gorizia Province, Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy, see Ravenna War Cemetery.

Udine War Cemetery (Tavagnacco di Udine, Udine Province, Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - 40 South Africans, 12 Australians, United Kingdom, New Zealand, 415 total burials from WWII, 14 unknown; 1 WWI burial.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to this cemetery is possible via the main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery is in the locality of Adegliacco in the Comune of Tavagnacco. The town of Udine is about 101 kilometres North-East of Venice. From the centre of Udine take the SS13 towards Tarviso. After 4.4 kilometres turn right, take the SS13 underpass and the cemetery will be found after the roundabout. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Udine in Europa Unita Street. Cemetery address: Via Alfieri - 33010 Tavagnacco di Udine (UD) Friuli Venezia Giulia. Latitude: 46.11700, Longitude: 13.22550.

At the beginning of April 1945, the Allies launched their final offensive against the German positions spread out in a line across Italy, south of Bologna. German resistance was by now beginning to disintegrate and the Allies were able to fan out rapidly across the Po valley. Udine was entered by troops of the 6th Armoured Division on 1 May 1945, the day before the German surrender in Italy. Burials in Udine War Cemetery include casualties from the last few days of the war in Italy, some earlier prisoner-of-war and air force casualties, later garrison burials and some made from 70 British General Hospital which was at Udine for several months from May 1945. The cemetery now contains 414 Second World War burials, 14 of them unidentified. There is also one special memorial in the cemetery, commemorating a soldier of the First World War who was buried at the time in Versa Comune Cemetery, but whose grave is now lost.

Versa, Frazione di Romans d'Isonzo, Gorizia Province, Friuli-Venezia Giulia Region, Italy see Udine War Cemetery

Lazio Region (see Anzio)

Anzio War Cemetery (Anzio, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 1 South African, 1 Australian, 1,056 total burials, 19 Unknown and museum.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site possible, may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Anzio is a coastal town 70 kilometres south of Rome. To reach Anzio take the No.148 Superstrada Motorway which runs between Rome and Latina. Take the exit for Anzio and follow the signs towards Anzio along the No.207. The Cemetery lies 1 kilometre north of Anzio town just off the No.207. As the No.207 approaches Anzio an Italian Comune Cemetery is visible on a small rise to the left of the road. Turn left and drive up a small rise to a parking area in front of the cemetery entrance. Commission signs are visible. Anzio War Cemetery should not be confused with Beach Head Cemetery which is also close to Anzio town. Beach Head Cemetery lies on the No.207, 5 kilometres north of Anzio town, and can be seen on the left hand side of the road when taking the No.207 towards Anzio. Cemetery address: Via del Cimitero - 00042 Anzio (RM) Lazio. GPS Co-ordinates: Latitude: 41.455473, Longitude: 12.623178.

Operations in January 1944 landed troops behind the German lines at Anzio, but defences were well organised, and a breakthrough was not actually achieved until May. The site for this cemetery was selected not long after the landings at Anzio and the burials here date from the period immediately following the landings. Anzio War Cemetery contains 1,056 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Beach Head War Cemetery (Anzio, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 burial; WWII Commonwealth - 1,980 United Kingdom, 70 Canadian, 25 South African, 7 Australian, 4 Indian, 4 New Zealander, and 9 others, 2,316 total burials, 295 unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Anzio is a coastal town 70 kilometres south of Rome. To reach Anzio take the Route No.148 Superstrada Motorway, which runs between Rome and Latina. Turn off the Superstrada at the No.207, following the signs towards Anzio. The route is well signposted from the Superstrada. The Cemetery lies 5 kilometres north of Anzio town on the No.207 and Commission signs are visible 150 metres from the cemetery. There is a small parking area at the main entrance. Beach Head War Cemetery should not be confused with Anzio War Cemetery which lies just off the No.207, 1 kilometre north of Anzio. Cemetery address: Via Nettunense km 34 - 00040 Anzio (RM) Lazio. Latitude: 41.482355, Longitude: 12.625456.

The site of the cemetery originally lay close to a casualty clearing station. Burials were made direct from the battlefield after the landings at Anzio and later, after the Army had moved forward, many graves were brought in from the surrounding country. Beach Head War Cemetery contains 2,316 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 295 of them unidentified. There is also one First World War burial which was brought into the cemetery from Chiete (??) Comune Cemetery near Rome. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Bolsena War Cemetery (Montefiascone, Viterbo Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 187 South African, 2 Australian, United Kingdom, Indian, Canadian, includes burials transferred from Elba, 597 burials, 40 unknown.

As there are steep steps and a long steep path within the cemetery, wheelchair access is impossible. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime.

Bolsena War Cemetery is situated on the eastern side of Lake Bolsena just west of the SS2, between Rome (104 kilometres) and Siena (115 kilometres). Take the Orte exit from the autostrada A1. Go 30 km west towards Viterbo then turn right on to the SS2. The two nearest towns are Montefiascone, 8 kilometres to the south, and Bolsena on the shores of the lake, 7 kilometres to the north. The cemetery entrance can be clearly seen from the main road. Cemetery address: SS2 Cassia (Nord) K106 - 1027 Montefiascone (VT) Lazio. Latitude: 42.585776, Longitude: 11.997886.

The Gustav line eventually fell in May 1944 and as the Germans fell back, Rome was taken by the Allies on 3 June. The Germans made their first stand after being driven north of Rome at Bolsena and to the east of Lake Bolsena, there was a tank battle in June 1944 between the 6th South African Armoured Division and the Hermann Goering Panzer Division. The site for the cemetery was chosen in November 1944, and graves were brought in from the battlefields between Bolsena and Orvieto. Almost one-third of those buried at Bolsena were South Africans. In 1947, 42 graves were brought into the cemetery (into Plot 4 Rows G and H) from the Island of Elba. The cemetery is on the actual site of the first camp occupied by General Alexander's advanced headquarters after the liberation of Rome and it was here that King George VI visited General Alexander at the end of July 1944. Bolsena War Cemetery contains 597 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 40 of them unidentified. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Cassino Polish War Cemetery (Cassino, Frosinone Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Polish - Burials of 1052 of the 4000 who died in this battle in the 2nd Army Corps are here. Another 250 Bellorussians from the West of Belarus (now Poland) are also buried here.

The Polish War Cemetery car park is 0.7 km (by road) from the car park at Monte Cassino Abbey.

From the Polish Cemetery car park, you progress down a sloping walkway (about 500 metres long) with about 3 flights of about 8 steps each.

Arriving at the cemetery gates, there is another flight of about ten steps to get up to the cemetery base. This cemetery is all stone. There is no grass in the main cemetery. The crosses are laid out on a steep terraced stone semi circle. You have to be reasonably fit to climb up there and then on to the garden further up the slope.

Cassino War Cemetery and War Memorial (Cassino, Frosinone Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 2253 United Kingdom, 852 Canadians, 456 New Zealand, 360 Indian, 47 South African, 13 Australian, 4,271 total burials, 289 unknown plus 4000 missing.(see town of Cassino)

Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, via a ramp at an alternative entrance, which can be located approx. 200 metres from the main entrance. Unfortunately, even with the support of local police, due to regular theft and damage to the Cemetery Register and Visitors Book, it is only possible for these to be accessible during the hours when the gardeners are present, as follows: Winter: 08.00-12.00 & 13.00-15.30 Summer: 07.00 - 12.00 & 13.00 - 15.30

Cassino War Cemetery lies 139 kilometres south-east of Rome. Take the autostrada A1 from Rome to Naples and leave it at the Cassino exit. At the junction of this exit and the road into Cassino, is the first of 6 clearly visible signposts to the cemetery and memorial. The cemetery is located approximately 1 kilometre from the railway station in Via Sant Angelo and visitors arriving by train are advised to take a taxi from the station. Cemetery address: Via S. Angelo 03043 Cassino (FR) Lazio. Latitude 41.477555, Longitude: 13.827141.

The site for Cassino War Cemetery was originally selected in January 1944, but the development of the battle during the first five months of that year made it impossible to use it until after the Germans had withdrawn from Cassino. During these early months of 1944, Cassino saw some of the fiercest fighting of the Italian campaign, the town itself and the dominating Monastery Hill proving the most stubborn obstacles encountered in the advance towards Rome. The majority of those buried in the war cemetery died in the battles during these months. There are now 4,271 Commonwealth servicemen of the Second World War buried or commemorated at Cassino War Cemetery. 289 of the burials are unidentified. Within the cemetery stands the Cassino Memorial which commemorates over 4,000 Commonwealth servicemen who took part in the Italian campaign whose graves are not known.

French Military Cemetery at Rome (Roma, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII French - 1,888 burials. - Mostly Morrocan and Algerian.

Is just off Via della Camillucia, toward the Olympic Stadium is a modest cemetery for 1,700 French Expeditionary Corps soldiers, mainly Moroccans and Algerians. The cemetery is at the end of a small road, Via dei Casali di S. Spirito. Most of the grave markers bear a Muslim crescent while some have crosses. All, however, bear the inscription “Mort pour la France”.

German Military Cemetery at Cassino (Caira, Frosinone Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII German - 20,027 burials.

3 kms north of the city of Cassino, on the road to Monte Cassino.

Minturno War Cemetery (Marina di Minturno, Latina province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 2049 burials.

Please Note: It should be noted that the left hand entrance path to the cemetery is temporarily closed as the roots of pine trees from the avenue are causing subsidence of parts of the path. The right hand path has been relevelled and at present is in good condition. We apologise for any inconvenience caused to visitors during this time. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Minturno is about 78 kilometres north of Naples, close to the coast. The cemetery lies several kilometres south of the town on the SS7 road to Naples and is situated in the locality of Marina di Minturno (Garigliano). To reach the cemetery take the Cassino exit from the A1 motorway, then turn right to follow Ausonia, Formia, Minturno. At about 30 km the road runs tangientially to a flyover. Go under the flyover, turn left and take the SS7 Appia road towards Scauri and Naples. Go over Scauri and then, after 4 kilometres, to Marina di Minturno and the cemetery is a further 3 kilometres, on the right hand side. Cemetery address: Via Virilassi, 1 - 4020 Marina di Minturno (LT) Lazio. Latitude: 41.240844, Longitude: 13.765905.

It was not until 17 January 1944 that the Garigliano was crossed, and Minturno taken two days later. The site for the cemetery was chosen in January 1944, but the Allies then lost some ground and the site came under German small-arms fire. The cemetery could not be used again until May 1944 when the Allies launched their final advance on Rome and the US 85th and 88th Divisions were in this sector. The burials are mainly those of the heavy casualties incurred in crossing the Garigliano in January. Minturno War Cemetery contains 2,049 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. The cemetery was designed by Louis de Soissons.

Non-Catholic Cemetery (Testaccio) (Roma, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - 6 WWI; 1 WWII, 7 United Kingdom, 7 total.

Non-Catholic Cemetery (Testaccio), is on the South side of the city, at the Porta san Paola.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Non-Catholic Cemetery (Testaccio) contains six Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There is also one Second World War burial.

Pomezia (Pomezia, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII German - 27,443 burials.

From Rome on the SS 148, via Pontina, for 26 kms south of Rome.

Rome (Verano) Comune Cemetery (Roma, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1 Canadian burial.

This is a large comune cemetery near the Piazzale del Verano in the San Lorenzo district about 2.5km due east of Termini Station in Rome.

Rome (Verano) Comune Cemetery contains one Commonwealth burial of the Second World War.

Rome War Cemetery (Commonwealth) (Roma, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 28 South Africans. 4 Australians, 355 United Kingdom, 22 Canadians, 3 Indian, 10 New Zealand, 1 from Mauritius, 2 Palestinian, 426 total burials.

Due to frequent vandalism and thefts, it is now necessary to keep the cemetery padlocked when the gardener is not present. The Combination number for the padlock is 1221 and the padlock is located at the rear of the gate, behind the two handles. The gardeners working hours are: Winter: Monday to Friday 08.00 to 12.00 and 12.30 to 15.00 Summer: Monday to Friday 0700 to 12.00 and 12.30 to 15.00 Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on 01628 507200.

Rome War Cemetery lies alongside and within the Aurelian Wall of the ancient city of Rome. It is reached from the Piazza Venezia, the centre of Rome, by going down the Via dei Fori Imperiali, past the Coliseum, and along the Viale Aventino as far as the Porta San Paolo. Before reaching this gate and the monument Pyramid of Caius Cestius, take the road to the right along the wall of the Protestant Cemetery, in which are buried the poets Keats and Shelley. Across the road at the far end of that cemetery will be seen Rome War Cemetery, on Via Nicola Zabaglia 50, Monte Testaccio. Alternatively, take the metro and get off at Piramide Metro Station, which is close to Rome War Cemetery, on Via Nicola Zabaglia 50, Monte Testaccio. Cemetery address: Via Nicola Zabaglia 50 - 00153 Roma (RM) Lazio. Latitude: 41.87502, Longitude: 12.477238.

Operations in January 1944 landed troops behind the German lines at Anzio, but a breakthrough was not achieved until 18 May when, after fierce fighting, Cassino finally fell to the Allies. Rome was taken on 3 June as the German withdrawal continued. The cemetery was started shortly afterwards and was used mainly for burials from the occupying garrison, but a few graves were brought in from the surrounding country, and some soldiers and airmen who died as prisoners of war in Rome are also buried there. Rome War Cemetery contains 426 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Sicily-Rome American Cemetery (Nettuno, Roma Province, Lazio Region, Italy) WWII US - 7,861 total burials plus 3,095 missing.

The cemetery is open daily to the public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. except December 25 and January 1. It is open on host country holidays. When the cemetery is open to the public, a staff member is on duty in the Visitor Building to answer questions and escort relatives to grave and memorial sites. GPS Coordinates: N41 27.918 E12 39.503

Sicily-Rome American Cemetery lies at the north edge of the town of Nettuno, Italy, which is immediately east of Anzio, 38 miles south of Rome. The cemetery can be reached by automobile from Rome along the Via Cristoforo Colombo, which runs into Via Pontina (highway 148). Drive south approximately 37 miles and exit at Campoverde/Nettuno. Turn right to Nettuno, continuing 5˝ miles to the cemetery. There is hourly train service from Rome to Nettuno, where taxicabs can be hired. There are numerous hotels in Anzio and Nettuno.

7,861 of American military war dead, arranged in gentle arcs on broad green lawns beneath rows of Roman pines. The majority of these men died in the liberation of Sicily (July 10 to August 17, 1943); in the landings in the Salerno Area (September 9, 1943) and the heavy fighting northward; in the landings at Anzio Beach and expansion of the beachhead (January 22, 1944 to May 1944); and in air and naval support in the regions. On the white marble walls of the chapel are engraved the names of the 3,095 missing.

Liguria Region

Cicagna, Genova Province, Liguria Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Monterosso al Mare, La Spezia Province, Liguria Region, Italy, see Ravenna War Cemetery

Savona Comune Cemetery (Savona, Savona Province, Liguria Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 85 total burials.

The cemetery is always closed on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sunday afternoons. Wheelchair access to site possible, maybe by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

Exit the A10 autostrada at Savona Vado. Follow the signs to Quiliano, which is immediately right and the Comune Cemetery is signposted. Proceed on foot toward the rear of the town cemetery and at the large cross in the centre, turn left, then right. Pass through an entrance way in a wall and follow the path. The CWGC plot is on the right. Cemetery address: Via Quiliano - Localita Zinola. Latitude 44.284061, Longitude: 8.437221

From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. On 4 May 1917, the Hired Transport "Transylvania", proceeding to Salonika with reinforcements, was sunk by torpedo off Cape Vado, a few kilometres south of Savona, with the loss of more than 400 lives. The bodies recovered at Savona were buried two days later, from the Hospital of San Paulo, in a special plot in the town cemetery. Others are buried elsewhere in Italy, France, Monaco and Spain. SAVONA TOWN CEMETERY contains 85 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, all but two of them casualties of the "Transylvania". There are also a number of Merchant seamen buried in the cemetery whose deaths were not due to war service. Within the cemetery is the SAVONA MEMORIAL, which commemorates a further 275 casualties who died when the "Transylvania" went down, but whose graves are not known.

Savona Memorial (Savona, Savona Province, Liguria Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 1 South African, 275 missing. See Savona Comune Cemetery.

Staglieno Comune Cemetery (Genova, Genova Province, Liguria Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - 9 South Africans, 13 Australians, 230 total WWI burials; 122 United Kingdom burials from WWII.

This cemetery is steeply terraced with numerous steps. It is necessary to climb the stairway to reach the CWGC Plots, which are on separate terraced levels connected by stairs. The 1914-18 Plots I and II are on Terraces 3 and 4, the 1939-1945 Plot (now known as Plot III) is on Terrace 6. (see layout plan). This cemetery is in the control of the comune authorities who reserve the right to close it at anytime without notice. The location or design of this site makes wheelchair access impossible. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

Exit at the A12 autostrada at Genova East and follow the signs for the direction of Genova. The road leads down a steep hill through several tunnels. At the bottom of the hill turn right and follow the road for a short distance alongside the riverbed. Take the first bridge to the left and cross to the opposite side of the river and turn left. Due to the one-way traffic system it is now necessary to cross the river again. Take the first bridge to the left, then turn left at the opposite bank. Take the first right just past a very small bus depot. A large Italian comune cemetery is visible on the right. Parking is available outside the comune cemetery. Walk through the large entrance gate into the comune cemetery and follow the road straight ahead. Signs for 'British Cemetery' are seen on the right after approximately 300 metres. Cemetery address: Piazzale Resasco - 16100 Genoa (GE) Liguria. Latitude: 44.428463, Longitude: 8.952248.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From November 1917 to the end of the war, Genoa was a base for commonwealth forces and the 11th General, and 38th and 51st Stationary Hospitals, were posted in the city. Staglieno Cemetery contains 230 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. There are also 122 Second World War graves, most of them garrison burials, others brought in from the surrounding country.

Lombardia Region

Bergamo, Bergamo Province, Lombardia Region, Italy, see Milan War Cemetery

Cardano al Campo Comune Cemetery (Cardano al Campo, Varese Province, Lombardia Region, Italy) WWI, WWII Italians

Milan War Cemetery (Milano, Milano Province, Lombardia Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 44 South Africans, 22 Australians, United Kingdom, Indian, New Zealand, 421 total burials, 27 Unknown, 6 non-commonwealth.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via the main entrance.

Take the tangenziale west, skirting Milan, from the autostradas A1, A4 or A7. Exit from the tangenziale (main road) following the blue signs for Milano, route SS11. Proceed in the direction of Milano and pass the Grand Hotel Brun. Take the sharp turn to the left following the CWGC signs. The cemetery lies in a large park approximately 0.5 kilometre along on the right. From the city centre head west following signs for the San Siro football Stadium. The road which runs past the stadium has local authority signs for Milan War Cemetery. If travelling by train, the nearest station is Forli, where a taxi service is available. Cemetery address: Via Cascina Bellaria s.n. - 20153 Milano (MI) Lombardia. Latitude: 45.48509, Longitude: 9.10420.

At the beginning of April 1945, the Allies launched their final offensive against the German positions spread out in a line across Italy, south of Bologna. German resistance was by now beginning to disintegrate and the Allies were able to fan out rapidly across the Po valley. Milan, already freed by Italian Partisans, was entered by the US 4th Corps on 2 May 1945, the day of the German surrender in Italy. As Milan fell to the Allies largely without a fight, the Commonwealth forces suffered few casualties. Most of the graves in Milan War Cemetery were those of prisoners-of-war or airmen and were brought in from the surrounding towns and villages - places such as Bergamo, Boves, Carpi, Cicagna, Modena, Parma, Piacenza, Turin (Torino) and Val-d'Isere (France) - after the war. Milan War Cemetery contains 417 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 27 of them unidentified. There are also six war graves of other nationalities.

Trecella Comune Cemetery (Trecella, Frazione di Pozzuolo Martesana, Milano Province, Lombardia Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 1 South African, 1 total burial.

Take the main road from Milan towards Treviglio No 11, and turn south down a small country road at the village of Inzago, 26 kilometres from Milan. To reach the cemetery, enter the hamlet of Trecella and turn sharp left. In the south-east corner of the cemetery is the grave of one airman of the Royal Air Force.

Marche Region

Ancona War Cemetery (Ancona, Ancona Province, Marche Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 79 South African, 13 Australian, Indian, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Canadian, 1019 total burials, 55 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to this cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. It should be noted that the cemetery is steeply terraced. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery lies in the rural locality of Tavernelle, 3 kilometres south of the town of Ancona. Leave the Autostrada A14 at Ancona Sud and take the SS16 towards Ancona. After approximately 3 kilometres (via Pietro Filonze) turn right to pass in front of the wholesale fruit market and under a railway line. Then at the next junction turn left and you will find the cemetery approximately 2 kilometres past the Stadio del Conero, the local football stadium. Cemetery address: Frazione Passo Varano - 60131 Ancona (AN) Marche. Latitude: 43.586764, Longitude: 13.522829.

The cemetery at Ancona reflects the Allied progress up the Adriatic coast in August and September 1944. The cemetery site was chosen in September and graves were brought in from a wide area round about, extending from Pescara, 80 kilometres farther south, to Pesaro, over 48 kilometres north of Ancona. They include those of casualties from the first attacks on the eastern sector of the German defensive Gothic Line, near Fano and Pesaro, at the end of August and early in September. Ancona itself had been taken by the Poles on 18 July 1944 and, being little touched by the war, served as the main port for supplies for the attack on the Gothic Line and for the final break through the following spring at Argenta. Ancona War Cemetery contains 1,019 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Fano, Pesaro and Urbino Province, Marche Region, Italy, see Ravenna War cemetery

Gradara War Cemetery (Gradara, Pesaro-Urbino province, Marche Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 14 South Africans, 2 Australians, 1 Belgian, United Kingdom, Canadian, 1191 total burials, 4 Unknown.

This cemetery is steeply terraced with numerous steps, therefore making wheelchair access impossible. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime.

It is located about 1.5 kilometres south of the SS16, midway between Pesaro and Riccione. Take the autostrada A14 (Bologna-Taranto) exiting at Cattolica or Pesaro, then go along the SS16 either east from Cattolica or west from Pesaro. Cemetery address: Via Pesaro s.n - 61012 Gradara (PU) Marche. Latitude: 43.941062, Longitude: 12.782378.

The site for the cemetery was chosen in November 1944 and it contains the graves of casualties incurred during the advance from Ancona to Rimini, which broke the German's heavily defended Gothic Line, and in the heavy fighting around Rimini, which was taken by the Allies on 21 September 1944. Gradara War Cemetery contains 1,191 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War. There is also one Belgian war grave.

Montecchio War Cemetery (Montecchio, a frazione of Montelabbate, Pesaro-Urbino province, Marche Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 6 South Africans, 289 Canadian, 284 United Kingdom, 2 Indian, 582 total burials.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

It stands on rising ground just north of the main road from Pesaro to Urbino, about 12 kilometres west of Pesaro. Take the SS 423 from Pesaro to Urbino, following the signs for Montecchio. Just before entering the town, the cemetery will be seen on the right hand side of the road. Cemetery address: Via Provinciale s.n. - 61025 Montelabbate (PU) Marche. Latitude: 43.860945, Longitude: 12.768968.

Following the fall of Rome to the Allies in June 1944, the German retreat became ordered and successive stands were made on a series of defensive positions known as the Trasimene, Arezzo, Arno and Gothic Lines. Montecchio lies near the eastern end of the Gothic Line. The anti-tank ditch of this defensive system used to run through the valley immediately below the cemetery. Montecchio village was practically razed to the ground for purposes of defence during the war and much damage was done in the surrounding country. The site was selected by the Canadian Corps for burials during the fighting to break into the Gothic Line in the autumn of 1944. An additional plot was added later for graves brought in from the surrounding country. Montecchio War Cemetery contains 582 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Molise Region

Venafro Free French Cemetery (Venafro, Isernia Province, Molise Region, Italy) WWII French - 6,000 men from Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia and other African countries who fought on behalf of the French are buried here.

Piemonte Region

Borgofranco D'Ivrea Comune Cemetery (Borgofranco D'Ivrea, Torino Province, Piemonte Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 South African burial total.

This town is 6 kilometres north of Ivrea on Route No.26 to Aosta. Borgofranco is about 45 kilometres north of Turin. The cemetery is located on Montebuono hill and is known as Montebuono Cemetery.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. Borgofranco D'Ivrea Churchyard contains one Commonwealth burial of the First World War.

Boves, Cuneo Province, Piemonte Region, Italy see Milan War Cemetery

Torino Comune Cemetery (Torino, Torino province, Piemonte Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 15 United Kingdom, 1 Australian, 16 total.

Wheelchair access to site possible, maybe by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

The cemetery (the "Cimitero Generale") is North-East of the Central station. Of the Commonwealth War Graves one is against the South-East side and the others are in a small plot against the North-West side.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. One section of No. 29 Stationary Hospital was at Turin in 1918. Turin Town Cemetery contains 16 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Puglia Region

Bari War Cemetery (Carbonara di Bari, Bari Province, Puglia Region, Italy) WWI and WWII Commonwealth - New Zealand, United Kingdom, 210 Canadians, 165 South African, 45 Australian, 2218 total WWII burials, 170 Unknown. 85 WWI burials from Brindisi.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the tangenziale which is part of the SS16, skirting Bari, and which is accessed from the autostrada A14. From the tangenziale take the SS100 south to Taranto at exit 13B. About 3 kilometres from exit 13B turn right to Carbonara. Then a left turn will eventually arrive at the cemetery (about 1.5 kilometres from the SS100). If travelling by train, alight at Bari Centro Station and take a taxi to the cemetery. Cemetery address: Via Antonia Quaranta - 70012 Carbonara di Bari (BA) Puglia. Latitude: 41.064841, Longitude: 16.894704.

The site of Bari War Cemetery was chosen in November 1943. There was no serious fighting in the vicinity of the town, which was the Army Group headquarters during the early stages of the Italian campaign, but it continued to be an important supply base and hospital centre, with the 98th General Hospital stationed there from October 1943 until the end of the war. At various times, six other general hospitals were stationed at Trani and Barletta, about 48 km away. Besides garrison and hospital burials, the cemetery contains graves brought in from a wide area of south-eastern Italy, from the 'heel' right up to the 'spur'. Here too are buried men who died in two disastrous explosions in the harbour at Bari, when ammunition ships exploded in December 1943 (during a German air raid) and April 1945. Bari War Cemetery contains 2,128 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 170 of them unidentified. There are also some non war burials and war graves of other nationalities. The cemetery also contains 85 First World War burials, brought in from Brindisi Comune Cemetery in 1981. Most of these burials are of officers and men of the Adriatic drifter fleet which had close associations with Brindisi during the First World War.

Taranto Comune Cemetery (Taranto, Taranto province, Puglia Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 South African, Indian, Maltese, Egyptian, United Kingdom, 449 total.

The cemetery gates are kept locked, except during our gardening staff's working hours. If you wish to visit the cemetery when the gates are locked, the combination to the padlock is 1221. To open the lock you should press a button on the lock after having dialled the combination number. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Proceed along the Highway No.A14, Bologna-Taranto, and take the road No.57 into Taranto from the direction of Bari, passing the large industrial complex on the left. Follow the sign to Grottaglia and then the signs to Tamburi Cimitero (Cimitero San Brunone). The CWGC Cemetery can be found on the road (which is one-way) just past the comune cemetery. Cemetery address: Via San Brunone - 74100 Taranto (TA) Puglia. Latitude: 40.490483, Longitude: 17.219963.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Taranto was used as a base by the Royal Navy immediately after the Italian declaration of war, but its importance to Commonwealth troops dates from the summer of 1917, when the Mediterranean lines of communication were established. These lines ran from the eastern theatres of war through Taranto, Turin, Lyons and Le Mans to Cherbourg. A base and rest camp were made at Taranto and labour units, including the 8th, 10th and 11th Battalions, British West Indies Regiment, were brought in. No 79 General and No 6 Labour Hospitals followed. The Town Cemetery was used for Commonwealth burials from June 1915 to April 1919, but as early as January 1918, it became necessary to open a military extension. After the Armistice the 102 Commonwealth burials in the town cemetery were removed to this extension, and the grave of one sailor was brought in from Trani Comune Cemetery in 1958. There are now 449 Commonwealth burials of the First World War in the extension. There is also 1 Non World War burial.

Trani, Barletta-Andria-Trani Province, Puglia Region, Italy see Taranto comune Cemetery

Sardegna Region

Cagliari (St. Michele) Comune Cemetery (Cagliari, Cagliari Province, Sardegna Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, Canadian, 6 Australian, 3 South African, 60 total, 10 unknown; WWII German - 424 from Sardegna battles, 16 from Milis battles, 190 from Malta (moved in 1960 from English Cemetery at Pembroke).

Opening Times: 08.00 - 17.45 Every day except Friday. Friday: Open mornings only 08.00 - 13.00. Wheelchair access to site possible, maybe by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

Cagliari is the chief town of the island of Sardinia and St Michele Comune Cemetery is 3.5 kilometres north of the town centre, 3 kilometres west of the airport, on the SS131 to Oristano. Cemetery address: Piazza dei Castellani, 2 - 09121 Cagliari. Latitude: 39.243837, Longitude: 9.101658.

Milis Cemetery (Milis, Oristano Province, Sardegna Region, Italy) WWII Italian - 30 burials.

Sicilia Region

Agira War Cemetery (Agira, Enna Province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 490 Canadian burials, 6 unknown.

Visiting Information: The cemetery is steeply terraced with numerous steps, making wheelchair access to this site impossible. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime.

Agira Canadian War Cemetery lies in the centre of Sicily. From the autostrada A19, Catania-Palermo, take the exit to Catenanuova. Follow signposts to Regalbuto, then pass Regalbuto, going in the direction of Agira. The Cemetery is then signposted past the lake, about 12 kilometres from Regalbuto. Alternatively, leave the A19 at Agira and the cemetery can be seen before turning up the hill to the town. Cemetery address: Contrada Pennino Buterno, 2 - 94011, Agira (EN), Sicily. Latitude: 37.6549115, Longitude: 14.55086.

The campaign in Sicily came to an end on 17 August when the two allied forces came together at Messina, but failed to cut off the retreating Axis lines. Agira was taken by the 1st Canadian Division of 28 July and the site for the war cemetery was chosen in September for the burial of all Canadians who had been killed in the Sicily campaign. Agira Canadian War Cemetery contains 490 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Catania War Cemetery (Catania Zona Industrial, Catania Province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 26 Australian, 25 South African, 2135 total burials, 113 unknown.

The cemetery may be visited at anytime. Pedestrian access is always possible, however, due to littering and other problems the local authority have found it necessary to control access by car, a gate has been erected approx 500 metres from the cemetery, this gate has a padlock. The combination of which is 1221. Owing to several thefts of the visitors' book and registers, these will not be available outside our gardeners normal working hours, at this time the register and visitors' book are kept locked in the gardeners toolshed. We apologise for any inconvenience caused to visitors. The gardeners working hours are as follows: WINTER: 08:00 - 12:00, 13:00 - 15:30 SUMMER: 07:00 - 12:00, 13:00 - 15:30 Wheelchair access to site is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200. PLEASE NOTE: The Commission is aware of the fly-tipping on the road leading to this cemetery but this is outside our control. However, our staff do inform the Security Personnel whenever this occurs.

Catania War Cemetery is 7 kilometres south-west of Catania. From Catania Airport follow the tangenziale (main road) towards the A19 (in the direction of Palermo). Before reaching the A19 the cemetery is signposted. Cemetery address: Stradale Passo del Fico - 95121 Catania Zona Industriale (CT) Sicily. Latitude: 37.46303, Longitude: 15.038888.

On 10 July 1943, following the successful conclusion of the north African campaign in mid May, a combined allied force of 160,000 Commonwealth and American troops invaded Sicily as a prelude to the assault on mainland Italy. The Italians, who would shortly make peace with the Allies and re-enter the war on their side, offered little determined resistance but German opposition was vigorous and stubborn. The campaign in Sicily came to an end on 17 August when the two allied forces came together at Messina, but failed to cut off the retreating Axis lines. Catania War Cemetery contains burials from the later stages of the campaign, from Lentini northwards. Many died in the heavy fighting just short of Catania (the town was taken on 5 August) and in the battle for the Simeto river bridgehead. Catania War Cemetery contains 2,135 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 113 of them unidentified.

Marsala (Marsala, Trapani province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth, see Syracuse War Cemetery

Messina Comune Cemetery (Messina, Messina province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 Australian, 2 United Kingdom, 3 total burials.

The British Cemetery is situated in the south-east corner of the main Messina Cimitero Monumentale, which is located on the Via Catania about 2 kilometres south of the ferry port to Calabria and the railway station. The British Cemetery can be entered from the main cemetery entrance, or, more directly, through a separate entrance from a side road.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. The Royal and Merchant Navies were active in the Mediterranean and Adriatic throughout the war and many of their dead are buried along the Italian coast. Messina Town Cemetery contains three Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Motta Sant'Anastasia (Motta Sant'Anastasia, Catania Province, Italy) WWII German - 5,400 burials. On SP 13, off of SS 121 (Catania-Paterno).

Siracusa Comune Cemetery (Siracusa, Siracusa province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 4 total burials

This cemetery is adjacent to Syracuse War Cemetery and lies 3 kilometres west of the city railway station, off the SS124, east of the branch to the SS114 which runs north to Catania. In this large civil cemetery are two Communal Graves located in Campo H2 and numbered 103 and 106; and two memorials affixed to the wall on the right hand side of the mortuary.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. The Royal and Merchant Navies were active in the Mediterranean and Adriatic throughout the war and many of their dead are buried along the Italian coast. Syracuse Communal Cemetery contains four Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Syracuse War Cemetery (Siracusa, Siracusa province, Sicilia Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 burial; WWII Commonwealth - 1059 burials, 134 unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to site possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Syracuse War Cemetery is located in the Contrada of Canalicchio in the Comune and Province of Syracuse. It lies 3 kilometres west of Syracuse. Turn left at the end of the Catania to Syracuse autostrada and the cemetery will be found approximately 5 kilometres along on the left hand side. Cemetery address: Contrada Canalicchio - 96100 Siracusa (SR) Sicily. Latitude: 37075086, Longitude: 15.258004.

Commonwealth forces made their landings in the south-east corner of the island between Pachina and Syracuse, and the majority of those buried in Syracuse War Cemetery died during those landings or in the early stages of the campaign. Many graves belong to men of the airborne force that attempted landings west of the town on the night of 9-10 July, when gale force winds forced 60 of the 140 gliders used into the sea and blew others wide of their objectives. Syracuse War Cemetery contains 1,059 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 134 of them unidentified. There is also one First World war burial, that of a merchant seaman whose grave was brought to the cemetery from Marsala British Cemetery.

Toscana Region

Arezzo War Cemetery (Pratanitico, Arezzo Province, Toscana Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, New Zealand, 50 South Africans. Plots VII-IX are Indian, 1266 total burials, 36 Unknown.

Florence American Cemetery -There are 4402 burials here, including 209 crosses marking the remains of unknown soldiers. There is also a wall of the names of the 1409 men whose remains were in unknown locations. An asterisk marks those names whose remains were later identified.

Take the Certosa offramp off the A1 and take the highway from Firenze to Siena to the first offramp. That offramp is marked with a brown sign saying American Cemetery. The Cemetery is the consolidation of the men who died in Northern Italy (and occasionally other locations). The burials started here in 1949 as they re-interred men who had been buried at Castelfiorentino, Pollonica, Marzanello Nuovo, Mirandola, Pietramala-Mt. Beni, Tarquinia, and Vada (Porte Rosse in Castellina Marittima). The monument was completed in 1957.

Florence (Gli Alliori) WWI Commonwealth

Florence War Cemetery (FI) WWII Commonwealth

Foiano della Chiana War Cemetery (AR) WWII Commonwealth

Futa Pass (Near Traversa, Firenze Province, Italy) WWII German - 30,683 burials.

Santerno Valley War Cemetery (Coniale, Firenze Province, Toscana Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - 2 South Africans, United Kingdom, Canadians, 287 total burials, 6 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited at any time. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible, but may be by alternative entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Santerno Valley War Cemetery is about 32 kilometres south-west of Imola and a little south of the main road from Imola to Fiorenzuola. Imola is a town on the SS9 halfway between Bologna and Forli. Take the autostrada A1 exiting Roncobilaccio and proceed in the direction of Futa-Fiorenzuola. Go past Fiorenzuola and carry on towards Imola. The cemetery, which is approximately 13 kilometres further on, will be seen on top of the hill on the right hand side. Cemetery address: Strada Statale 610 Cercetole - 50030 Coniale (FI) Tuscany. Latitude: 44.163589, Longitude: 11.473492.

The cemetery was started by the British 78th Division during the fighting in the Appennines towards the end of 1944, and was later added to by bringing in burials from the surrounding region. Santerno Valley War Cemetery contains 287 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Trentino-Alto Adige Region

Bozen (Bolzano, Bolzano Prozince, Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Italy) WWI German - 1,967 burials; WWII - 174 burials.

Brixen (Bressanone, Bolzano Province, Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Italy) WWI German - 1,229 Austrian-Hungarians, 400 German; WWII German - 106 burials.

Bruneck (Brunico, Bolzano Province, Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Italy) WWI German - 669 Germans, 103 Russians, 13 Serbians, 7 Romanians, 792 total; WWII German - 19 Germans, 5 citizens of Brunico, 4 Monte Cassino combatants, 1 Italian officer, 29 total.

Mattarello Comune Cemetery (Mattarello, Trento Province, Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 South African, 1 UK, 2 total.

The cemetery is 8 kilometres South of Trento. It was extended by the Austrians, and the War graves are now in the South-East part.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Mattarello was behind the Austrian lines and in the comune cemetery, which they extended, are two Commonwealth burials of the First World War, both airmen.

Meran (Merano, Bolzano Province, Trentino-Alto Adige Region, Italy) WWI German - 1,528 burials: WWII German - 1,058 burials

Umbria Region

Assisi War Cemetery (Rivotorto di Assisi, Perugia Province, Umbria Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, New Zealand, 55 South African, 945 total burials, 3 Unknown.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access to the cemetery is possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

The War Cemetery forms part of the locality of Rivotorto in the Comune of Assisi. From Rome, take the Autostrada A1, Rome-Milan. Come off at Orte and go along the SS3 bis to Perugia following the signs for Assisi. Take the road to Rivotorto and at a crossroads, from which a church is visible, turn left and the cemetery is about 500 metres down this road. Cemetery address: Via Sacro Tugurio - 6080 Rivotorto di Assisi (PG) Umbria. Latitude: 43.046561, Longitude: 12.609357

Rome was taken by the Allies on 3 June. Many of the burials in this cemetery date from June and July 1944, when the Germans were making their first attempts to stop the Allied advance north of Rome in this region. The site for the cemetery was selected in September 1944 and burials were brought in from the surrounding battlefields. Assisi War Cemetery contains 945 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War.

Orvieto War Cemetery (Orvieto, Terni Province, Umbria Region, Italy) WWII Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 3 South Africans, 190 total burials, 2 Unknown.

This cemetery is steeply terraced with numerous steps which makes the site impossible for wheelchair access. The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime.

Orvieto War Cemetery lies in the Comune of Orvieto. Take the autostrada A1, Rome-Milan and come off at Orvieto. Head towards the centre of the town and a CWGC sign will be found pointing to the right. To reach the cemetery from Orvieto the Perugia road is taken. At the fork just beyond the River Paglia bear right along the road to Todi. Forty metres down this road a country lane will be seen on the right. Turn down this lane and in just a little more than one kilometre the cemetery will be seen in a depression in the hills on the left. A farm track leads to it. Cemetery address: Cippo dei Sette Martiri, 113 - 5019 Ciconia Orvieto (TR) Umbria. Latitiude: 42.726389, Longitude: 12.150000.

This cemetery was established as a battlefield cemetery by the 78th Division in the middle of June 1944, during the first heavy fighting north of Rome. The burials, with only one exception, date from the period 14 June-4 July 1944. Orvieto War Cemetery contains 190 Commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 2 of which are unidentified.

Veneto Region

Arzignano, Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy, see Ravenna War cemetery

Barenthal Military Cemetery (Near Asiago, Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 1 Australian, 125 total, 9 unknown.

July 2008: NOTE - Over time, detioration of stone occurs and as part of its maintenance programme the Commonwealth War Graves Commission will be replacing the headstones in Barenthal Military Cemetery. The cemetery is permanently open, though from November to May it is rarely accessible due to deep snow falls. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

One of 5 cemeteries situated on the Asiago plateau in the province of Vicenza, in the Veneto region. This cemetery lies 5 kilometres south of the town of Asiago on a minor, narrow road that loops round from the village of Cesuna to Asiago.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. In March 1918, XIV Corps (the 7th, 23rd and 48th Divisions) relieved Italian troops on the front line between Asiago and Canove, the front being held by two divisions with one division in reserve on the plain. The French held the line to the left, with the Italians to the right. The front was comparatively quiet until the Austrians attacked in force from Grappa to Canove in the Battle of Asiago (15-16 June 1918). The Allied line was penetrated to a depth of about 1,000 metres on 15 June but the lost ground was retaken the next day and the line re-established. Between June and September, frequent successful raids were made on the Austrian trenches. In October, the 7th and 23rd Divisions were sent to the Treviso area of the River Piave front. The 48th Division, which remained in the mountains as part of the Italian Sixth Army, played an important part in the Battle of Vittorio Veneto (24 October-4 November 1918) in which the Austrians were finally defeated. Barenthal Military Cemetery is one of five Commonwealth cemeteries on the Asiago Plateau containing burials relating to this period. It contains 125 First World War burials, nine of them unidentified.

Carre' (Carre', Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Italian burials.

Costermano (Costermano, Verona Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWII German - 21,951 burials.

Dueville Comune Cemetery Extension (Dueville, Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 1 South African, 2 French, United Kingdom, 136 total burials.

The extension is a CWGC cemetery and is permanently open. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our enquiries department on telephone number 01628 634221.

Dueville is 12 kilometres north of the town of Vicenza. Leave the piazza in the centre of Dueville and head north towards Montecchio. At the traffic lights turn left onto Via Fosca. The cemetery is 100 metres on the left opposite the comune cemetery. Cemetery address: Via S. Fosca s.n - 36031 Dueville (VI) Veneto. Latitude: 45.63984, Longitude: 11.54823.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From April 1918 to the early months of 1919, the 9th, 24th and 39th Casualty Clearing Stations occupied the village school at Dueville and used the extension to the communal cemetery for the burial of those who died of wounds or disease. The Allied front on the Asiago Plateau was about 22 kilometres distant; the Piave front, to which the XIVth Corps was moved for the final attack on the Austrian positions in October 1918, was about 64 kilometres from the village. The cemetery now contains 134 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, some of which were brought into the cemetery from other burial grounds after the Armistice and in the following years. The extension also contians two French war graves.

Feltre (Feltre, Belluno Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI German - 273 burials.

Giavera British Cemetery and Memorial (Giavera del Montello, Treviso, Veneto Region, ) WWI Commonwealth

Giavera is 12 kilometres east of Montebelluna and 20 kilometres west of Conegliano on the S248, the road that joins the two towns. Take the Treviso Nord exit from the A27 in the Spresiano - Giavera direction then follow the signs to the cemetery. The cemetery is 1 kilometre from the village, on the hill Montello. Buses run from Montello and Conegliano train stations. Cemetery address: Via Monsignor Agnoletti s.n - 31040 Giavera del Montello (TV) Veneto. Latitude: 45.803000, Longitude: 12.164500.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. On 4 December 1917, the X1th and XIVth Corps relieved the Italians on the Montello sector of the Piave front, with the French on their left. The Montello sector acted as a hinge to the whole Italian line, joining that portion facing north from Mount Tomba to Lake Garda with the defensive line of the River Piave covering Venice, which was held by the Third Italian Army. The Commonwealth troops on the sector were not involved in any large operations, but they carried out continuous patrol work across the River Piave, as well as much successful counter battery work. In January 1918, an additional sector of the defence on the right was taken over by the Commonwealth troops. Between December and March the Royal Flying Corps carried out a large number of successful raids on enemy aerodromes, railway junctions, and other objectives. In March 1918, the Commonwealth troops on the Montello sector were relieved. Three Divisions (7th, 48th and 23rd) took over the Asiago sector in the mountains north of Vicenza, and two Divisions (5th and 41st) were despatched to France. In October, the 7th and 23rd Divisions were withdrawn from the Asiago Plateau to take over the northern portion of the X1th Italian Corps front from Salletuol to Palazzon, on the River Piave. These Divisions took a prominent part in the Passage of the Piave (23 October-4 November 1918) during the final Battle of Vittorio-Veneto. On 4 November the Armistice came into effect, and active hostilities ceased. Men who died in defending the Piave from December 1917, to March, 1918, and those who fell on the west of the river during the Passage of the Piave, are buried in this cemetery. GIAVERA BRITISH CEMETERY contains 417 Commonwealth burials of the First World War. Within the cemetery stands the GIAVERA MEMORIAL, which commemorates more than 150 members of the Commonwealth forces who died in Italy in 1917 and 1918 and whose places of burial are unknown.

Montecchio Maggiore Comune Cemetery (Montecchio Maggiore, Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WW I Commonwealth - 2 United Kingdom total burials.

The cemetery can be found after exiting the Autostrada A4. Follow the direction Montecchio Maggiore then through traffic lights, a roundabout and after two more traffic lights turn left. There is a sign “Cimitero”. Follow this road to “viale cimitero” The two headstone are on the left side of the far right hand path.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. From the Summer of 1917 until late 1918, the Mediterranean lines of communication for the British Salonika Force ran the length of Italy from Taranto in the south-east, to Turin in the north-west. Montecchio Maggiore Communal Cemetery contains two Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Montecchio Precalcino Comune Cemetery Extension (Vicenza Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - United Kingdom, 3 South Africans, 439 total.

July 2008: NOTE - Over time, detioration of stone occurs and as part of its maintenance programme the Commonwealth War Graves Commission will be replacing the headstones in Montecchio Precalcino Comune Cemetery Extension. This is a steeply terraced cemetery within the civil cemetery, which makes wheelchair access impossible. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200. The cemetery is always kept open.

Montecchio Precalcino is a town in the Province of Vicenza, 4 kilometres north of Dueville and 16.8 kilometres north of the town of Vicenza. Take the autostrada A31, Vicenza Schio, and leave it at Dueville. Follow the signs for Montecchio Precalcino. On arriving in the village a CWGC sign will be seen. Cemetery address: Via Stivanelle s.n. - 36030 Montecchio Precalcino (VI) Veneto. Latitude: 45.66659, Longitude: 11.557821.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Between April 1918 and February 1919 those who died from wounds or disease in the 9th, 24th and 39th Casualty Clearing Stations were buried either here or at Dueville. Certain graves were brought in after the Armistice from other burial grounds in the area. Montecchio Precalcino Comune Cemetery Extension contains 439 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Padova Comune Cemetery (Padova, Padova Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 25 total, 11 from Albano Bagni, 25 total.

Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Exit the A13 motorway at Padua South. Follow signs for the direction of Vicenza. These signs lead through several intersections on the No.11 road. Continue to follow this road through a semi-urban area on the outskirts of Padua. Continue in the direction of Vicenza. After several kilometres, Padua Main Cemetery can be seen on the right and there is a large car park in front of it. Enter the main gate on foot and proceed to the middle right, to the South-East part of the Cemetery, where the Commonwealth plot is to be found.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918, and rest camps and medical units were established at various locations in northern Italy behind the front, some of them remaining until 1919. Padua was at first General Headquarters for the Commonwealth force fighting in Italy and No. 37 Casualty Clearing Station was also posted there. The city was severely bombed by Austrian airmen. Padua Main Cemetery contains a plot of 25 Commonwealth burials of the First World War, 11 of which were brought in after the Armistice from the Canal Cemetery, Abano Bagni.

Padua War Cemetery (Padova, Padova Province, Veneto Region, Italy) Commonwealth - 391 United Kingdom, 15 Canadian, 9 Australian, 26 New Zealander, 74 South African, 517 total burials, 32 Unknown, 4 other nationalities.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number 01628 507200.

Take the autostrada A13 exiting at Padua South, then head north to Vicenza to the SS11. Alternatively, take the autostrada A4, exiting at Padua West, then head South to the SS11, then west to Vicenza. The SS11 in Padua is the Via Chiesanuova from which, at about 2 kilometres from the town centre, a right turn is made onto the Via della Biscia. Follow this until the cemetery is reached on the right. Cemetery address: Via della Biscia 126 - 35136 Padova (PD) Veneto. Latitude: 45.421618, Longitude: 11.839925.

At the beginning of April 1945, the Allies launched their final offensive against the German positions spread out in a line across Italy, south of Bologna. German resistance was by now beginning to disintegrate and the Allies were able to fan out rapidly across the Po valley. Padua War Cemetery lies in the zone of the Allied breakthrough in the spring of 1945 when, despite some resistance, the town was captured by Indian troops. The cemetery contains 513 commonwealth burials of the Second World War, 32 of them unidentified. There are also four war graves of other nationalities and one non-war burial.

Passo Pordoi (Livinallongo del Col di Lana, Belluno Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI German - 8,582 burials: WWII German - 847 burials

Quero (Quero, Belluno Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WW I German - 3,465 burials

Sacrario Militare di Pian di Salese (Pieve di Livinallongo, Livinallongo del Col di Lana, Belluno Province, Veneto Region, Italy) is a WWI Austro-Hungarian - 685 Italian military, 19 Austrian-Hungarian military plus 4700 unknown, 5404 total, all  of whom were brought here from other war cemeteries in the area in 1935.

Tezze British Cemetery (Tezze, frazione of Vazzola, Treviso Province, Veneto Region, Italy) WWI Commonwealth - 356 total burials.

The cemetery is permanently open and may be visited anytime. Wheelchair access possible via the main entrance.

The village is 8 kilometres east of Susegana, a town on the main road some 24 kilometres north of Treviso. The British Military Cemetery lies about 270 metres south of the village of Tezze. Take the Treviso Nord exit or Conegliano Veneto exit from the A27 (both are about 20 kilometres from the cemetery), go in the Vazzola - Tezze direction and then follow the signs to the cemetery. If travelling by train, a bus service is available from Conegliano Station. Cemetery address: Piazza Tigli - Vazzola (TV) Veneto. Latitude: 45.81328, Longitude: 12.34760.

The Italians entered the war on the Allied side, declaring war on Austria, in May 1915. Commonwealth forces were at the Italian front between November 1917 and November 1918. The village of Tezze was captured by the Austrians in the advance in the autumn of 1917 and remained in their hands until the Allied forces crossed the River Piave at the end of October 1918. On 21 October 1918, Commonwealth forces comprising the XIVth Corps (7th and 23rd Divisions), which had been transferred from the Asiago sector, took over the part of the River Piave front from Salletuol to Palazzon, serving as part of the Italian Tenth Army. On the night of 23 October, the main channel of the river was crossed using small boats and the northern half of the island of Grava di Papadopoli was occupied, the occupation being completed two nights later by a combined Commonwealth and Italian force. After the capture of the island, the bridging of the Piave proceeded rapidly, although the strength of the current meant that the two bridges built for the crossing were frequently broken and many men were drowned. The Allied attack east of the Piave began early in the morning of 27 October. Despite stiff resistance and difficulties with bringing forward supporting troops across the river, the Austrians were forced back over the next few days until the Armistice came into effect on 4 November. Many of those who died on the north-east side of the river during the Passage of the Piave are buried in Tezze British Cemetery. It now contains 356 Commonwealth burials of the First World War.

Links to other sites about Italian War Cemeteries include:

Battle for Anzio
Battle for Cassino
Commonwealth Military Cemeteries
South African War Graves
Canadian War Cemeteries
WWII Military Cemeteries

GenTracer POW Kathy Kirkpatrick

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